Geeking Out Over Arthropods

This past week, over 3500 scientists who study insects and other arthropods gathered in Austin, Texas, for the Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting. Scientific meetings like this one are important events where scientists share research results, catch up with colleagues, forge collaborations, and learn about new tools and techniques.

Your Wild Life researchers were out IN FORCE at the meeting, talking about our exciting arthropod research in cities and homesClint Penick presented work comparing nutritional differences among ants that live in highly urban habitats like road medians versus wooded areas in parks within New York City. Emily Meineke shared her research about the effects of urban warming on scale insects (tree pests) and the natural enemies that keep them in check. Elsa Youngsteadt discussed the effects of Hurricane Sandy on New York City arthropods. Michelle Trautwein presented results from the Arthropods of Our Homes project, focusing on the remarkable diversity of flies within our homes.

In addition to communicating about their research, entomologists attending the Annual Meeting also use the event as an excuse to TOTALLY GEEK OUT about one’s passion for insects and arthropods.

Check out all the arthropod love oozing from attendees answering this question: What is Your Favorite Arthropod? (We bet you’ll recognize some familiar YWL faces and friends in the video including Magda Sorger and Alex Wild!)

Of course, now we have to turn around and ask you –

What’s your favorite arthropod?

Want to learn more about Entomology 2013? Entomology Today has an excellent run-down of meeting-related happenings, videos and news. Bug Girl, Gwen Pearson, was also on-site in Austin and shares her thoughts over at Charismatic Minifauna.

By |2016-11-22T13:47:17-05:00November 14th, 2013|

About the Author:

Holly Menninger
As Director of Public Science, Holly coordinates our empire of citizen science projects and manages the online science communication here at Your Wild Life. An entomologist by training, she’s a science communicator by passion and practice.

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