Reading Roundup: NYC Natural History

Photo credit: Mark Heard (Flickr)

Lately, we’ve featured a number of posts about our team’s adventures in urban ecology this last summer. Amy shared stories about the challenges of studying ants in Manhattan, Christi took you on a collecting trip to Baltimore, and Jeremy described a day-in-the life of a budding ant biologist working along Chicago’s train tracks.

In a couple weeks, we’ll be taking you back to New York City as our quest to understand the Ants on Broadway continues. We’ll share our adventures in real-time through the blog and Twitter – Stay tuned.

In the meantime, as I mentally prepare for doing fieldwork in the Big Apple (Yes, they do let me get out of the office every once in awhile… time to dust off my field boots!), I thought I’d share a few things I’ve been reading to bring me up to speed on NYC natural history.

  • Out Walking the Dog – Melissa Cooper shares observations and photos of the nature she spots while rambling around city parks and neighborhoods with her canine companion.  Sometimes the most unusual things turn up on her walks… like peacocks!
  • Local Ecologist – Musings on nature, community, and open space, served up with a side on cultural history.
  •  NPR Cities – This new series by NPR is trying to capture the vibrancy of urban life in all of its facets – the people, the architecture, the history, even the nature. Sure, it’s not specific to the Big Apple, but I thought I’d share since I’ve been enjoying the stories and interactive features, including this one, asking urbanites to share the ‘heart’ of their city.

Have you read some cool stuff about the natural history of NYC? Please share! Comment |Twitter| Facebook

Happy Reading!

By |2016-11-22T13:47:31-05:00October 5th, 2012|

About the Author:

Holly Menninger
As Director of Public Science, Holly coordinates our empire of citizen science projects and manages the online science communication here at Your Wild Life. An entomologist by training, she’s a science communicator by passion and practice.

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